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At Sanjeevani we have introduced organic farming of following Cereals:

1. Basmati Rice
2. Non Basmati Rice
3. Wheat
4. Jowar (Shorghum)
5. Bajra (Pearl Millet)
6. Ragi (Finger Millet)
7. Amaranthus (Ramdana / Chaulai)
8. Barley

These all products are available as per standards and organic regulation of NOP and NPOP.

The word cereal derives from Ceres, the name of the Roman goddess of harvest and agriculture.

Cereal is a grass cultivated for the edible components of their composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop they are therefore staple crops.

3 1In their natural form (as in whole grain), they are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, oils, and protein. However, when refined by the removal of the bran and germ, the remaining endosperm is mostly carbohydrate and lacks the majority of the other nutrients. In some developing nations, grain in the form of rice, wheat, millet, or maize constitutes a majority of daily sustenance. In developed nations, cereal consumption is moderate and varied but still substantial.

Cereals are staple food of people in America, Africa, and of livestock worldwide. A large portion of major cereal crops are grown for purposes other than human consumption. Maize, wheat and rice together accounted for 87% of all grain production worldwide, and 43% of all food calories,
while the production of oats and rye have drastically fallen from their earlier production levels.


While each individual cereal has its own peculiarities, the cultivation of all cereal crops is similar. Most are annual plants; consequently one planting yields one harvest. Wheat, rye, triticale, oats, barley, and spelt are the "cool-season" cereals. These are hardy plants that grow well in moderate weather and cease to grow in hot weather (approximately 30 °C but this varies by species and variety). The "warm-season" cereals are tender and prefer hot weather. In developed countries, cereal crops are universally machine-harvested, typically using a combine harvester, which cuts, threshes, and winnows the grain during a single pass across the field. In developing countries like India, a variety of harvesting methods are in use, depending on the cost of labor, from combines to hand tools such as the scythe or cradle.

Some Cereal grains are deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. That is why a multitude of vegetarian cultures, in order to get a balanced diet, combine their diet of grains with legumes. Many legumes, on the other hand, are deficient in the essential amino acid methionine, which grains contain. Thus a combination of legumes with grains forms a well-balanced diet for vegetarians. Common examples of such combinations are dal (lentils) with rice by South Indians and Bengalis, dal with wheat in Pakistan and North India, and beans with corn tortillas, tofu with rice, and peanut butter with wheat bread (as sandwiches) in several other cultures, including Americans.

 

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